Author Topic: Changing of the Guard  (Read 2277 times)

Thomas

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Re: Changing of the Guard
« Reply #45 on: August 07, 2017, 12:04:55 AM »
A PDF eBook version of Changing of the Guard is now available through my website, in case anyone has been waiting for that option to be offered.

Next up: I have to make the book available through the Apple store. Hopefully it will be up before the end of the week. Then I'll send out the newsletter I prepared. I wonder if there's anyone left out there that doesn't know the book has been published? Yeah, there must be at least a couple of folks who haven't gotten the word. The newsletter will close that gap.  ;D

After that I start working on the next book.   8)

Ty

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Re: Changing of the Guard
« Reply #46 on: August 07, 2017, 08:56:35 AM »
Next book as in book 4 of Border Patrol?  One problem I have with Border Patrol is how out of sync the series is with the main series.  Border Patrol books have always been behind on the timetable and that was probably the intention but its now a lot worse now because book 3 is only 6 months long in the story timetable, and Changing of the Guard is 2 years long.  I think there is a 5 year difference now.

Anyway, I assume your next project is BP book 4 followed by SCI book 2----or have your plans changed?

Thomas

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Re: Changing of the Guard
« Reply #47 on: August 07, 2017, 09:34:34 AM »
Yes, the next book will be the AGU:BP-04 book. While the Jenetta Carver books seem to be a bit more popular, there are many folks who like the Sydnee Marcola series more. The protagonists, while both highly intelligent, resourceful, and brave, are quite different.

Although both series occur in the same story universe, there is a considerable separation, with limited interaction to keep readers from becoming too confused. I understand that fans have different preferences, but I like both storylines.

After that I intend to write a AGU:SCI book. I had intended to make it a novella, but so many fans complained about the brevity of the novellas that I've decided to make it a full length novel. Naturally, that extra reading time comes with a price. It takes twice as long to write a novel, so there will be more time between releases. C'est la vie, mon amis.

Ty

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Re: Changing of the Guard
« Reply #48 on: August 07, 2017, 10:55:29 AM »
I look forward to any book you write in the AGU universe.  I love them all.  I do however have a preference for the main series since it paints a bigger picture to me.  I wasnt one to complain about how short SCI book 1 was since it means you could get back to the main series faster, although it was pretty short.
In a perfect universe where you could write as fast as I can read, i would perfer to have full lenght SCI books of course.  ;D But i'm not going to wish for it, because next thing you know, my reading speed will sloooooow waaaaaay down. :lol:  :D

Thomas

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Re: Changing of the Guard
« Reply #49 on: August 07, 2017, 11:37:16 AM »
...although it was pretty short.

The AGU:SCI-01 book, The Star Brotherhood, is 51,000 words. Novellas are typically 20,000 to 35,000 words, so by novella standards it's really long. A lot of authors produce what they call novels with just 40,000 words. However, Sci-Fi works are usually much longer than other genres, so I understand why people were upset. It was the first, and possibly the last, novella I'll write in the AGU universe. One reviewer on Amazon called it a Short Story. Short Stories are usually 1,000 to 5,000 words in length. So I guess that shows you how upset some readers were when I released it.   ;D

Ty

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Re: Changing of the Guard
« Reply #50 on: August 07, 2017, 11:52:48 AM »
....although it was pretty short.

This was coming from someone who loves long books like The Wheel of Time which averages around 300,000+ words a book, and The Stormlight Archive which has nearly 400,000 words per book.  If you consider SCI-1 a novel, it is short and that is probably how most readers, myself included, saw it as.  If I only consider it a novella, then i agree that it is fairly long.  I think there needed to be more emphasis on the fact that it is a novella, not a novel.
« Last Edit: August 07, 2017, 12:00:09 PM by Ty »

Thomas

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Re: Changing of the Guard
« Reply #51 on: August 07, 2017, 12:31:43 PM »
When I finished writing A Galaxy Unknown, it was about 145,000 words long (I think that was the size. I don't remember clearly because that was sixteen years ago.) Anyway, I was quickly informed that publishers won't even consider books that long from an unknown author. Since they didn't know back then if a new author's work would sell, they didn't want to invest in big books. Paper cost, print expense, and distribution was the main factor then. I was told that a first book should NEVER be longer than 90,000 words. So I cut the book in half and re-edited it as two books. As it turned out, the first book wound up being 133,000 words after I edited it, and the second book was about 107,000 words after editing. So that would have been 240,000 words if I had gotten the book published as one. As it turned out, I couldn't get the big publishers to give me the time of day anyway. DAW Books rejected everything I wrote, as did TOR Books. Baen Books acknowledged receipt of the manuscript in 2002, and then never contacted me again to even send me a rejection notice. At least DAW and TOR always responded with a rejection notice. I never submitted to Baen again. Random House offered me a writing contract in 2011, but that was after I'd had all seven of my seven sci-fi books appear in the top ten of the Amazon Sci-Fi Best Seller list. At one point I had five in the Top Ten at the same time. So I guess that made me a 'known' quantity.   ;D

« Last Edit: August 07, 2017, 12:33:44 PM by Thomas »

Thomas

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Re: Changing of the Guard
« Reply #52 on: August 07, 2017, 03:26:40 PM »
I wasn't familiar with The Wheel of Time books so I went to take a look. Wow! James Oliver Rigney, Jr. wrote a lot of books before his death, and they would seem to still be very popular.

Mr. Jordan (Rigney's pen name) wrote in what I call the nineteenth century style and I'm sure his books are great, but when I tried to write in that style, I had readers pounding me about the head to get on with the story. What I call the nineteenth century style is where the author takes three pages to describe a sunrise, and six for a sunset. I prefer to let readers use their imagination for such things. I'm not saying that the older style is bad. It's not. It's just a different style of writing from my own. It's great for people who have limited imaginations and need voluminous descriptions to 'paint' a picture in their minds, or have lots of free time for reading. But I've learned that most people who read sci-fi have incredible imaginations and get bored if you delay the action with lots and lots of background material. My writing style is no doubt the reason no publisher would give me the time of day back in 2000. The style of the day was still very much nineteenth century prose. And for many genres it still is. Someone recently referred to my work as amateurish because I didn't include enough descriptive material in the latest book. The person was coming into a series with fourteen previous books written, without having read any of the previous books. It's no wonder that person felt lost. It's like sitting down to watch a movie that's three-quarters over. When I first started writing in the mid-nineties, I posted short stories on free fiction sites under a variety of pen names. Perhaps it was because they were short stories but readers complained when I took too long to get to the meat of the story. Back in the 90's people all over the globe were saying, 'The printed word is dead.'  From my perspective, I deduced that many people were so occupied with their incredibly busy lives that they simply didn't have time to read a 800 page book where the plot only required 400 pages to tell a good yarn. So I began cutting out all the 'superfluous' descriptive stuff long before I started writing commercially. I tried to have the reader totally invested in the story before they finished the first chapter. As I've said, a lot of people love paragraphs and paragraphs of descriptive prose, but I developed my style for people with busy lives, excellent imaginations, and limited time for reading. And if people want to call my work amateurish, I say let them. I've sold many hundreds of thousands of books to readers who enjoy my work and I will continue to write in the style I developed back in the 1990's. But there's nothing wrong with the nineteenth century style, and I know many people who love it. They just don't usually buy my books.   ;D
« Last Edit: August 07, 2017, 08:58:30 PM by Thomas »

Ty

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Re: Changing of the Guard
« Reply #53 on: August 07, 2017, 09:26:38 PM »
Its not just the descriptions that take up so many words.  The scope of the story is also huge and closely following many different characters as the story progresses.  Game of Thrones is another example of this, but i honestly only lasted to book 3 when I tried reading it.  You might have noticed that I'm only mentioning fantasy series here.  I actually only read a small handfull of sci fi, but the ones I read are among my favorite books. Most of what I read is fantasy though.  I've been thinking of adding more sci fi to my reading list but by the time i manage to read my way through the books i got lined up to read, I feel like rereading another series from earlier in the list.  So i just keep juggleing them.  Still, sometimes i get to add new stuff to the list.  A few years ago, AGU was one of those new series that got added.  ;D

Thomas

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Re: Changing of the Guard
« Reply #54 on: August 08, 2017, 07:39:47 AM »
...A few years ago, AGU was one of those new series that got added.  ;D

I'm honored that you selected AGU for your private library.    ;D

tiggerboy

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Re: Changing of the Guard
« Reply #55 on: August 13, 2017, 06:48:08 AM »
Tom:
  Great addition to the series, but you got a problem now with the Cats.
 Why are you dragging your feet letting the Sisters adopt a Kitten.  I know you said mutual agreement, but the distance apart makes that unworkable.
 Second Cayla told Christa that any of the Kits would love to be with her or Eliza.
That brings up another problem:( 1 or 2) Jenetta always said splitting up her cats would lead to mischief keeping one by themselves, and being sentient will they get their own seats on the bridge .
If you left it up to me the sisters would get the black Kits so they could pull a twins switch in the future.

Thomas

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Re: Changing of the Guard
« Reply #56 on: August 13, 2017, 08:55:20 AM »
This really belongs in the Spoiler Alert thread, so that's where I answered it.

MrDanS

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Re: Changing of the Guard
« Reply #57 on: August 23, 2017, 06:14:24 PM »
I completely forgot about Book 11, up till a week or two back.
Needless to say it was quickly purchased for my trusty old Kindle, and readily consumed.
I need to re-read it again as I often do with your books, however I do not dread it I always welcome it. :)

I was glad to see how Jenetta was adapting, and excited to see the other changes in the guard taking place.
If only Syd knew--

I already was looking forward to Syd's next adventure. Changing of the Guard is making it look even more enticing.
I didn't even want to mention the shenanigans Trader Vyx & his posse are still in line for.

Oye vaye, it's like sitting outside the kitchen door during Thanksgiving while all the food is being prepared.  :-X
I'm looking forward to it all.  ;D