Author Topic: I resent Amazon  (Read 358 times)

Clathrus

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I resent Amazon
« on: June 18, 2015, 06:17:16 AM »
In spite of KU, I think Amazon's practices will ultimately screw readers.  I have purchased ebooks from Amazon that weren't available anywhere else, but I resent it and very seldom do it.  I have decided never to do it again regardless of how much I might enjoy the book,  I resent Amazon's effort to force readers to buy a Kindle.

I don't want books given away for free unless the author proactively decides it should be done.  If writers can't make a living they won't write, and I want them to keep on writing.  I want them to be paid enough that they can afford decent proof readers, for God's  sake.  No writer can proof read his/her own stuff adequately. 

garybliev

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Re: I resent Amazon
« Reply #1 on: June 18, 2015, 02:29:52 PM »
I've moved away (minimized) from purchasing books/ebooks from Amazon.   New product usually comes from Books A Million or kobe.  Used books from Better World Books or Thrift books. 

I do prefer dead-tree editions, when I do get an ebook, I'll view it on an android table running the kindle, kobe, or a generic reader app.  Thus far, I've had no need to purchase the kindle branded device.


LtBeefy

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Re: I resent Amazon
« Reply #2 on: August 22, 2015, 07:57:09 PM »
Confused here. To read books from amazon you don't need a kindle. They have the kindle reading app pretty much for all devices. Which is free to download, so I'm not sure how they are forcing people to buy kindles in order to read books.

And please correct me if I am wrong. Isn't KU an option for the authors to enroll in? Books in KU are enrolled into it by the authors themselves, so they can choose if they want to or not. And again correct me if I am wrong, they do get paid when people read their books from KU. They tally how many readers the book had, the total profit from KU users and then dish it out from there.

Thomas

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Re: I resent Amazon
« Reply #3 on: August 22, 2015, 09:22:29 PM »

And please correct me if I am wrong. Isn't KU an option for the authors to enroll in? Books in KU are enrolled into it by the authors themselves, so they can choose if they want to or not. And again correct me if I am wrong, they do get paid when people read their books from KU. They tally how many readers the book had, the total profit from KU users and then dish it out from there.

Yes, the KU is a voluntary program. My personal objection to it is that they force authors to be exclusive to Amazon if you want to participate. You can't even sell the book on your own website if you enroll it in KU.

The first KU program paid based on reader 'borrows.' It was changed a few months ago and they now track how many pages every borrower has read in every borrowed book and pay about half a penny per page. Big brother is now living in Seattle, WA.   ???

Figeroa

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Re: I resent Amazon
« Reply #4 on: July 16, 2017, 01:08:25 AM »
So Amazon give peoples books away for free without permission? That can't be true.

Thomas

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Re: I resent Amazon
« Reply #5 on: July 16, 2017, 10:10:58 AM »
So Amazon give peoples books away for free without permission? That can't be true.

You misunderstood the statements. Amazon doesn't give books away for free without the author's permission. Amazon merely demands that authors give them exclusive right to distribute books if authors wish to participate in two of the three sales programs Amazon has. For example, if an author wishes to participate in the Kindle Unlimited program where readers can read an unlimited number of books each month for a set fee, the author must make their book exclusive to Amazon. The author cannot offer the book to any other book seller or book lender on the planet. They cannot even sell the book through their own website.  They effectively turn over ALL control of the eBook to Amazon.

I offer eBooks through Scribd where readers can read books through a monthly plan similar to Amazon's. Actually, Scribd and Oyster were established long before the Kindle Unlimited program, but Oyster went out of business not long after the Amazon Kindle Unlimited program started. I'm not saying the KU program drove them out of business, but losing most of their offerings to the KU exclusivity requirement sure didn't help. But that's how companies such as Amazon grow and get to dominate an industry. Every company wants to be a monopoly. Look at the cable companies such as Comcast, Spectrum (Time Warner and Charter) and Cox. I constantly read reports in the news that declares they are the most hated companies in America. How does a company that's hated continue to grow and prosper. Simple. They have virtual monopolies in many parts of the U.S. And where they don't have monopolies, the competition conveniently charges the same exorbitant rates. Competition has been effectively stifled.